Journalism

Upcoming classes: Journalism


Lindsey Crittenden

 

 

 

THURSDAY, JANUARY 4 —FEBRUARY  1  | Whatever your background, if you’re looking to generate pages and gain insight into your project, set aside five Thursday evenings this winter. You’ll find a supportive community designed to foster productivity and good writing habits.  We’ll set goals, frame a workable practice that makes sense for you, and hold each other accountable – without blame.

Each session will start with a check-in and a writing prompt suitable for generating new material or deepening existing work. We’ll share what we’ve worked on in the intervening week, as applicable, and spend time writing.

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Roberto Lovato

 

 

 

TUESDAYS, JANUARY 16 —30  |  For our foreseeable futures, crisis—personal, political, civilizational crisis—will remain a fact of life. How we, as writers, incorporate these multiple and interconnected moments of truth into our journalism and creative (fiction, poetry, nonfiction) writing will be a major measure of our ability to reach readers awash in unprecedented instability.

This interactive course will incite writers to delve deeper into the inflection points that drive our narratives—and, often, our lives. Using examples from the classical and contemporary literature and journalism of crisis, we will explore the ways these narratives use crises to structure, move and animate their work.

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Grace Rubenstein and Julia Scott

 

 

 

WEDNESDAYS, JANUARY 17 —FEBRUARY 7  |  Audio is a powerful medium that’s surging in popularity. It’s never been easier to produce high quality audio to get your message out, whether for radio stories, podcasting, personal promotion or business branding. But how do you get started? Two veteran journalists of public radio and podcasting show you the basics of how to record great audio, conduct killer interviews, craft a captivating story, and get your audio creations out into the world.

In this hands-on workshop, every student will produce a complete audio story — and will acquire the skills and confidence to produce future stories and whole podcasts on your own.

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Anisse Gross

Yukari Iwatani Kane

 

 

 

WEDNESDAYS, JANUARY 17 —FEBRUARY 28  | Do you understand the basics of journalism but aren’t sure how to take a story from idea to publication? Do you feel daunted by the idea of pulling together a story? Do you have an idea you want to work on, but haven’t been able to muster the time or focus to work on it?

In this seven-week course, you will develop reporting and writing skills by taking an idea and turning it into a finished story. This class will be taught in tandem by Anisse Gross and Yukari Iwatani Kane, both experienced journalists working in the field.

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Julia Scheeres

 

 

 

THURSDAYS, JANUARY 18 —FEBRUARY 22  | This workshop is geared toward intermediate to advanced writers who would like to receive regular feedback on their work. Each week’s session will begin with a discussion of a short reading on craft or a few pages from a narrative. Students will then read aloud a few pages of their own work (500 – 1,000 words) and receive constructive feedback from their instructor and peers.

The aim of this workshop is to give participants regular writing deadlines and encouragement as they polish their prose. Your only homework—aside from brief, inspirational readings—will be to write, write, write.

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Laird Harrison

 

 

 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21  |  If you’ve ever tried freelance writing, you’ve encountered a jungle. Publishing thrills abound, but if you don’t watch out, you get eaten alive. That’s because competition is stiff and writing skills don’t translate easily into income. To survive, you’ll have to think like a hard-nosed business person.

In this course, you’ll learn to evaluate the market for your work by analyzing your strengths and weaknesses, finding your competitive edge and identifying your niche. Does a previous career or academic training give you depth of knowledge in a specialized field? Do you live in a news hotspot?

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Constance Hale

Constance Hale

 

 

 

MONDAYS, JANUARY 22 —FEBRUARY 26  |  Storytellers—whether they are novelists, memoirists, or narrative journalists—know that characters are key to any great yarn. Yet developing characters is harder than you might think. Especially minor ones, where few words must make an impression. But even when we have paragraphs—or an entire book— to capture character, we don’t always hit the nail on the head. Connie Hale, who has made the profile her preferred form, uses readings, in-class exercises, and writing prompts to help you draw people on the page—and draw out important themes. The class will move from short sketches to longer work, which will be workshopped in class.

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Mary Ladd

 

 

 

MONDAY, JANUARY 29  | Big challenges can spark writing that is personal, meaningful and cathartic. We’ll read from Oliver Sacks and Joan Didion and do our own generative short exercises to explore how to find points of entry into personal experiences of loss. The setting facilitates your ability to access memories and ideas and connect them to the page in a safe and supportive environment. You will leave the class with starting points for possible essays, stories, poems.  All genres are welcome.

As a seriously ill patient as well as a caregiver for my mom, I channeled my grief into a book project and writing assignments (to help pay the bills and avoid going crazy).

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Julia Scheeres

 

 

 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4  | The beauty of nonfiction books is that they can frequently be sold on the basis of a 40- to 60-page proposal. What is a proposal? Essentially, it is a business plan for your book – a document that outlines your book’s basic premise, provides data indicating that there’s a sizable audience for it, and otherwise convinces a publisher to give you money to write it. Memoirs, narrative journalism, business books, histories, and biographies can all be sold on proposal.

In this seminar, students will learn the seven components of a book proposal, read examples of proposals that sold, and get the lowdown on the publishing industry – including the best way to find an agent.

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Rachel Howard

 

 

 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24  |  “Flat” writing hands off lifeless information in a two-dimensional exchange between reader and writer.  Three-dimensional writing places the reader in a charged space of heightened experience, renewed perspective, and active meaning-making.  How is that three-dimensionality created, and what do you do when you find your language stuck in 2-D?  This combination lecture and workshop for writers of fiction and literary nonfiction examines specific strategies for three-dimensionality drawn from contemporary writers like Sheila Heti, Jo Ann Beard, and Maggie Nelson, and classics by Marguerite Duras and Bruno Schulz. We will try out new techniques and tricks—but ultimately what you will achieve is a shift in consciousness that will help make your writing spacious and transporting.

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